B.C. Government bans transport of oil in LNG pipelines

By Shayna Wiwierski

Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline is a twin pipeline that would carry LNG from Bruderheim, Alberta, to Kitimat, British Columbia (shown here).

Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline is a twin pipeline that would carry LNG from Bruderheim, Alberta, to Kitimat, British Columbia (shown here).

The Government of British Columbia has banned the transport of oil in pipelines built for Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) terminals.

In an effort to make sure that LNG lines aren’t converted to carry oil sands crude to coastal markets, the B.C. Government has put into effect a regulation that covers six proposed pipelines, all which would carry natural gas for LNG export terminals planned for the province. Established under the Oil and Gas Activities Act, the new measure prohibits the BC Oil and Gas Commission from permitting any conversion of a natural gas pipeline supplying an LNG facility.

The ban stems from concerns by aboriginal leaders and environmental groups that pipelines built to serve B.C.’s LNG industry could be used to transport crude oil or diluted bitumen.

“Many First Nations want to work with the Province and proponents on major natural gas pipeline developments, but some have strong and differing views about oil or diluted bitumen pipelines. A regulation prohibiting the automatic conversion of natural gas pipelines for these purposes goes a long way to address the concerns we have heard,” said John Rustad, British Columbia’s Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation, in a statement.

The provincial government pledged last year that LNG pipelines would never be converted to carry oil. The proposed LNG pipeline project would convert hundred of miles of existing gas pipeline between southeastern Alberta and Cornwall, Ontario to carry crude to refineries and export facilities in Quebec and New Brunswick.  Although the plan would provide thousands of new jobs for the province, numerous aboriginal groups are opposed to the project as the pipeline would go through their territories and land.

“Environmental concerns are a top priority for Moricetown Indian Band because of what the land means to our traditions, sustainability and way of life. This regulation provides our community with peace of mind so that we can focus on discussing the benefits that natural gas will bring without worry that oil will flow through the pipelines,” said Chief Barry Nikal, Moricetown Indian Band, in a statement.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments are closed.