Strong First Nations support for pipeline projects for LNG

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Support for the liquefied natural gas industry is growing among First Nations in northern B.C. To date, the Province has signed a total of 62 pipeline benefits agreements with 29 of 32 eligible First Nations (more than 90 per cent) that are located along four proposed natural gas pipeline projects: Pacific Trail Pipeline, Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project, Prince Rupert Gas Transmission Project, and the Westcoast Connector Gas Transmission Project.

Natural gas pipeline benefits agreements with First Nations are part of the B.C. government’s comprehensive plan to partner with First Nations on LNG opportunities, which also includes increasing access to skills training and environmental stewardship projects.

Pacific Trail Pipeline

The Pacific Trail Pipeline is a proposed 480-kilometre natural-gas pipeline to deliver gas from Summit Lake, B.C. to the Kitimat LNG facility site at Bish Cove on the northwest coast. All 16 First Nations located along the proposed route have come together to form the First Nations Limited Partnership (FNLP). The Province has an agreement with the FNLP that will provide an estimated $32 million in direct benefits during the construction phases of the project, as well as a further $10 million in annual payments to the partnership during the operational life of the project. The 16 First Nations of FNLP are:

  • Haisla Nation
  • Kitselas First Nation
  • Lax Kw’alaams Band
  • Lheidli T’enneh First Nation
  • McLeod Lake Indian Band
  • Metlakatla First Nation
  • Nadleh Whut’en First Nation
  • Nak’azdli Band
  • Nee Tahi Buhn First Nation
  • Saik’uz First Nation
  • Skin Tyee First Nation
  • Stellat’en First Nation
  • Ts’il Kaz Koh (Burns Lake) First Nation
  • West Moberly First Nations
  • Wet’suwet’en First Nation
  • Moricetown Band

Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project

The Coastal GasLink Pipeline is a 670-kilometre natural-gas pipeline from the Dawson Creek area to the proposed LNG Canada facility near Kitimat. The Province has reached natural gas pipeline benefits agreements with 17 of the 20 First Nations along the proposed pipeline route. Eleven First Nations have announced their agreements, and other agreements will be made public as they take effect. The 11 announced agreements are with the following First Nations:

  • Doig River First Nation
  • Halfway River First Nation
  • McLeod Lake Indian Band
  • West Moberly First Nation
  • Lheidli T’enneh First Nation
  • Yekooche First Nation
  • Nee Tahi Buhn First Nation
  • Moricetown Band
  • Skin Tyee First Nation
  • Wet’suwet’en First Nation
  • Kitselas First Nation

Prince Rupert Gas Transmission Project

The Prince Rupert Gas Transmission Project is a proposed 900-kilometre natural-gas pipeline to deliver natural gas from the Hudson’s Hope area to the proposed Pacific NorthWest LNG facility near Prince Rupert. To date, 16 of the 19 First Nations along the proposed pipeline route have benefits agreements in place with the Province. Eleven First Nations have announced their agreements and other agreements will be made public as they take effect. The 11 announced agreements are with the following First Nations:

  • Doig River First Nation
  • Halfway River First Nation
  • McLeod Lake Indian Band
  • Gitanyow First Nation
  • Lake Babine First Nation
  • Nisga’a Nation
  • Yekooche First Nation
  • Tl’azt’en First Nation
  • Gitxaala First Nation
  • Kitselas First Nation
  • Metlakatla First Nation

Westcoast Connector Gas Transmission Project

The Westcoast Connector Gas Transmission Project is a proposed natural-gas pipeline approximately 850 kilometres in length to carry natural gas from production areas in northeast B.C. to BG Canada’s proposed LNG export facility on Ridley Island, near Prince Rupert. The Province has reached natural gas pipeline benefits agreements with 14 of 19 First Nations along the proposed route. Three First Nations have brought their agreements into effect:

  • Gitxaala First Nation
  • Gitanyow First Nation
  • Kitselas First Nation

SOURCE: Province of B.C. 

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